Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘International Issues’ Category

One of the first posts I ever wrote for this blog dealt with the ban of the burqa and niqab by French authorities. It offended me that women were not allowed to choose their own dress and practice their faith as they wished. I had hoped at the time that France might relent and realize that instead of freeing women, they were instead oppressing them by taking away their right to choose. Yet, this past week, I suddenly found that this controversy had reignited after several French cities chose to ban the “burqini.” To clarify, the burqini is very different from a burqa. It doesn’t cover the face, for starters. Essentially, it is leggings and a long-sleeve shirt with an attached head-covering. It is worth noting that the burqini is not exclusively used by Muslims. In fact, the creator of the burqini said the new publicity has led to many more orders from non-Muslim women, especially survivors of skin cancer who need extra protection from the sun.

Already there have been numerous incidents of conflict. Multiple women have been ordered to leave beaches and fined as a result of wearing the swimwear. The most recent incident was a mother with her crying daughter who was forced to publically strip while three policemen stood over her with pepper spray. Numerous bystanders shouted at her and told her to go back where she came from; the woman in question comes from a family who has been citizens of France for at least three generations. Several of the women who have been forced to leave were in fact not wearing the burqini, but were stopped because they had covered their hair.

I’ve felt pain as I’ve read these stories. I myself choose my swimwear based on my religious beliefs; I refuse to wear bikinis of any kind or any swimwear that doesn’t cover my stomach or sides. This is what makes me most comfortable. I don’t choose my bathing suits or any other clothing because I am pressured to do so, but because these are what make sense for me. The thought of being forced to wear clothing that was too immodest for me is a horrible feeling. And this is a line that every woman should be able to decide for herself. For those of you who happily wear bikinis, as you should be able to, think of what it would be like if you went to a beach and were informed that you could only be on the beach topless or without any bathing suit at all. Additionally, there are plenty of women who prefer more modest swimwear simply because they prefer it, and it has absolutely nothing to do with their religious beliefs.

What’s most outrageous behind this religious discrimination is the logic that people are using to justify it. For instance, that it is a religious symbol that is linked to ISIS and therefore a threat to France. Grandmothers swimming with their families are really not trying to destroy your country. The conflation of the practice of Islam with ISIS is dangerous and offensive. Secondly, the assertion that this swimwear might be offensive to people of other religious beliefs or non-religious beliefs is ridiculous. In a free society, one religion isn’t supposed to have to accommodate the other; all are supposed to be able to practice freely. If an atheist asked me to cover up my cross so as not to offend them, I would probably look at them as if they had two heads.

Women in France deserve the right to make their own decisions and have full autonomy, and that includes the right to choose their own clothes and practice their own religion. To do otherwise is a manifestation of bigotry and of sexism. Any country that claims to take women’s rights seriously cannot do it by legislating their behavior and dress.

For more details: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3754395/Wealthy-Algerian-promises-pay-penalty-Muslim-woman-fined-France-wearing-burkini.html

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Religious Tolerance in Egyptian Protests

Disclaimer: This is not my photo. I downloaded this from a friend’s wall who had shared it from their friend’s wall. The photo was public.  My main source of information was the caption beneath this picture.  While I have not verified this, I have no reason to believe it’s not legitimate.

This photo was reportedly taken from the protests that were taking place in Egypt, where police crackdowns were also occurring.  This is a picture of Muslims at the protest performing daily prayers, and Christians holding hands around them to protect the Muslims from the police violence while they wee praying. 

I think this is a powerful photo.  With all people’s talk about the violence and divisiveness that pervades the Middle East, I think this photo underscores a poweful message.  If this photo speaks to the future of the Middle East, then there is abundant cause for hope.  It nearly brought tears to my eyes with happiness. 

I will admit that later, I experienced a bit of sadness when I thought about the poem, realizing that in many places in the United States, where we claim to be so open-minded and accepting as opposed to the rest of the world, I am not sure that this have happened, that many Christian Americans would have been so ready to protect Muslim Americans, and I pray in the future that may change and that we may take a lesson from this photo. 

We must protect and care for one another, no matter of what faith.  What binds us together can be stronger than what divides.  As Jesus has said, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”, we must protect others’ rights to worship, as we want ours to be.  And most importantly:  we are all Children of God.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: