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Posts Tagged ‘presidency’

“First they came for the Latinos, Muslims, women, gays, poor people, intellectuals and scientists and then it was Wednesday.”

 

I saw this tweet last week.  It someone managed to sum up all of my feelings, along with the difficulty of fighting against everything at once.  As Jon Stewart said, “The presidency is supposed to age the president, not the public,” but it already feels like months.

 

Two weeks ago, almost to the day, Donald Trump was sworn in as president, and at the end of the day, I felt like, “Okay, well, we’re all still here, good start…”  The next day I was at the women’s March in Boston.  I had wanted to write a blog post about it, but, you know, life.  It was a great day, though, as a person with a disability, the standing took a toll after about three hours and I never even got to actually march…but I was there and I stood for what I believed in.  I really felt the small children who got to ride in strollers and sleep when they were bored were doing the March right…  I loved how many people came out.  There were people climbing trees in order to see the speakers, and, for all the complaints about protestors, I didn’t see a single person disrespect a police officer or engage in any sort of vandalism.  It was very peaceful.  I do want to note, though, that while I am proud of everyone for ensuring that that was the result, it is a lot easier for things to remain peaceful when no one is opposing you.  The water protectors at Standing Rock are facing an entirely different kind of protest, and it’s important to remember that instead of just patting ourselves on the back for a job well done.

 

So, what has happened in those two weeks?  Well, I could write articles on specific issues, BUT THERE ARE TOO MANY OF THEM and I have a job.  We’ll go through the greatest hits and we’ll do our best to ignore anything that’s just stupid or doesn’t happen to be to our taste (example: I wouldn’t have picked that person for the supreme court, but I have no objections to his qualifications and I’m willing to take an agree to disagree on that one (even though I remain disgusted that, with a year left in office, no one would even vote on the president’s nominee as required by law).

 

In no particular order…

 

  • EPA has been put on some sort of lock down. No communicating with the press.  No renewing grants.  No projects.  In other environmental news, the Utah senator tried to sell off 3.3 million acres of federal land and the House just repealed a regulation banning mining companies from dumping waste in rivers and streams.  I was reading about that this day and…I was just so confused.  So there are people who don’t believe in global warming.  So there are people who believe that there’s too much regulation and government overreaching.  But who really thinks companies dumping waste in our water supply is a good thing?  Where are your children getting their drinking water for schools?  This really just made absolutely no sense to me.
  • Half the federal agencies have gone rogue on twitter what would be really amusing if it wasn’t real life.
  • Jared Kushner and Steve Bannon replaced the chairman of the joint chiefs and the head of the CIA as voting members on the National Security Council. This, frankly, is insane. Neither of these people have any experience or role that qualifies them to weigh in on national security.  I assure you, also, when they’re deciding whether or not to use force, I want the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs weighing in.  When they’re debating whether or not to bomb someone in the Middle East, I want the CIA there giving the best information they have available.  Even numerous Republicans have denounced this move.
  • Apparently we all need guns in our schools to defend ourselves from grizzly bears…. In case you missed it, Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s pick for secretary of education, advocated guns in schools, citing a school that needed to defend itself from grizzly bears attacking the students.  The best part of this story was that when they called the school that was referenced, they don’t have a gun…
  • The House just repealed a regulation that prevented people with serious mental illnesses from buying guns. This again falls into the category of “aren’t there some things that we can just all agree are bad ideas?”
  • Trump announced that we are indeed going to build a wall. And who’s going to pay for it?
  • We have spent a lot of time arguing over things like how many people were at the inauguration
  • He has accelerated the approval of the Keystone and Dakota Access Pipelines
  • And then we come to the one that caused mass chaos this past weekend: the Muslim Ban.

 

There are numerous issues with the ban, some practical, some ethical.  First of all, the utter airport chaos indicated how poorly thought out and executed this idea was.  It targeted people who already were in this country legally but just picked the wrong time for a vacation.  People detained in airports were denied due process or the right to see attorneys, even when attorneys were provided for them or congressmen and women wanted to help intercede for them.  The ban ended up affecting numerous Christians and Yazidis, the very religious minorities that Trump suggested would not be affected by the ban.  The implication that Christians are the only religious minorities in these countries shows just how clueless Trump is about foreign policy.  If we are going to show favor to religious minorities in the immigration process, does that include Shiites coming from a Sunni-majority country?  No one has been killed by a refugee since the 70s.  Since 9/11, no one has been killed in a terrorist attack by anyone from these banned countries.  The main country that the 9/11 hijackers were from, Saudi Arabia, was not included in the ban (some people have noted that Trump has business ties in Saudi Arabia).  All of these refugees are heavily vetted, in a process that usually takes over two years.

 

But most of all, all I can say is that I felt a punch in the gut as all of this came out.  I am, like all of us who are not Native Americans, descended from immigrants, and mine are within the twentieth century.  More than that, my heart hurt for all of the people, God’s people, who were being shut out, who were being rejected, who were being damaged and ignored by this order.  All I could hear was the verse in Matthew: “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’  They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’ He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’”  As a nation, we have rejected God’s people and therefore we have rejected Jesus.  All I can hope is that the religious extremists who believe that the collective country bears the sins of their leaders are wrong, for our country has committed a great sin and God hears the cries of those whom we have turned away from.

 

And so, moving forward, I’m doing the best I can.  I take deep breaths.  I pray.  I work.  I hope.

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When I’m at work tomorrow, I will be praying for Donald Trump.  I’ve been praying for him to have wisdom and compassion, and to make the right decision for all of God’s children living in this country.  Donald Trump will be praying tomorrow too, at his pre-inaugural prayer service.

 

His choice of pastors is deeply concerning.  He chose Robert Jeffress, a man who is best known for his controversial comments in the 2012 primaries where he discouraged people from voting for Romney because he wasn’t a real Christian and Mormonism was a cult.  He is a frequent guest on Fox news and leads a Texan megachurch.  In addition to his critiques of Mormonism, Reverend Jeffress has also insulted the Catholic Church, which he believes is a “counterfeit religion” under the direct influence of the devil, referring to it as “the genius of Satan.”

 

He has made inflammatory comments about Islam, referring to it as a “heresy from the pit of hell,” an “evil religion,” and that Muslims, along with Hindus and Mormons, worship a false God and are therefore not heavenly favored like Christians.  Additionally, he has made despicable comments about homosexuality, stating that is a “miserable lifestyle” that leads to suicide or substance abuse.  He argued that gay rights have the potential to destroy our country and that people who are gay are attempting to brainwash people into being gay.  He compared it to incest, pedophilia, and bestiality.  He has argued that Obama’s support of gay marriage shows the ease with which the antichrist will takeover our society.  I haven’t read anything about derogatory comments about women and their roles in society…but I really can’t imagine that someone who takes these kind of Biblical views doesn’t have those on the record somewhere.

 

This is who Donald Trump has chosen as his spiritual guide as he steps into the Presidency.  It sends a heart-rending message to those of us who believe in a God of love, who see Catholics as brothers and sister in Christ, who believe that Muslims pray to the same God, and who, above all, want this president, who claims to be LGBTQ –friendly, to represent all Americans and to see justice done for them.

 

In addition to that, two of the pastors speaking at his inauguration are proponents of the “prosperity gospel.”  The prosperity gospel, or prosperity theology, sees religious faith as a contract between the believer and God.  If a person is a good Christian, God will reward them with wealth and health.   Donations to churches or religious organizations will lead to a person receiving more wealth (for more details on this, see John Oliver’s segment on church financing, it probably will make you nauseous).  The corollary of that is, of course, is that those who are poor or sick or otherwise struggling are doing so because they are bad Christians, that God does not favor them or care about them as much, and that it is their fault, for their lack of faith and obedience, that they are not well-off.  This is a theology that I believe is painfully contradictory to the words of Jesus Christ, who exhorted us to care for the poor and to have compassion for all those who were struggling, whose deep and equal love for all human beings is the foundation of Christianity.  I suppose it should not surprise me that someone with President-Elect Trump’s background would gravitate to the prosperity gospel, but I find it tragic that this theology, and the bigotry expressed by Jeffress, is being promulgated on a national level from the white house.

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